Biomin additive can restrict trichothecene mycotoxins in poultry feed: EFSA

© istock/MaXPdia

A Biomin additive aimed at mycotoxin control in poultry feed has garnered a positive opinion from EFSA.

The Parma based risk assessor found an ingredient under the Austrian producer’s Mycofix range, BBSH 797, when included at the recommended dose, returned the concentration of deoxynivalenol (DON) to or below the level seen in the uncontaminated control with a concomitant production of the de-epoxy metabolite.

“This is a promising step in achieving an additional EU authorization for Biomin BBSH 797. Stringent EFSA guidelines set a high bar for additive manufacturers.

“EFSA acknowledged the efficacy of Biomin BBSH 797 in safely biotransforming trichothecenes into non-toxic compounds in the gastrointestinal tract of poultry, as demonstrated in numerous feeding trials,” said the Austrian company in reaction. 

Trichothecenes have been detected in corn, wheat, barley, oats, rice, rye, vegetables, and other crops. They are common contaminants of poultry feeds and feedstuffs and their adverse effects on poultry health and productivity have been studied extensively (Leeson et al., 1995). 

The mycotoxin, DON, is a member of the trichothecene family. Animal scientists have linked DON contamination of feedstuffs to feed refusal, impaired gut health, diarrhea and pasty vents, decreased resistance to environmental and microbial stressors and increased susceptibility to disease.

Previously, the EFSA FEEDAP panel found this additive did not raise any safety concerns when used in pig feed, and they confirmed it could reduce the trichothecene, deoxynivalenol (DON), producing the less toxic de-epoxy metabolite.

Biomin is now seeking EU approval for the use of the additive in feed for all poultry species and, since the current authorization only covers DON, the amending of that to include all trichothecene mycotoxins. 

Efficacy findings

Beside in vitro and ex vivo studies, the EFSA panel said in vivo trials in chickens and turkeys for fattening and laying hens also showed the additive is effective. In all three, the inclusion of the additive returned the concentration of DON in excreta to or below the level seen in the uncontaminated control group, said the Authority.

“Since the applicant proposes the use of the same dose in minor avian species and as the mode of action will the same as seen in chickens and turkeys for fattening and for laying hens, Biomin BBSH 797 can be considered efficacious for all avian species at a dose of 1.7 × 108 CFU/kg complete feed,” found the panel. 

EFSA also verified the additive can reduce the 12,13-epoxide group in a number of representative trichothecenes and said it would be reasonable to assume a similar reaction with other mycotoxins of the same structural type. “This effect would be independent of the animal species or category receiving contaminated feed,” added the FEEDAP panel.

In addition, those experts found the additive is compatible with the coccidiostats monensin sodium, salinomycin sodium, narasin, narasin/nicarbazin, nicarbazin, robenidine hydrochloride and diclazuril.

Safety review

EFSA said the additive was also safe for poultry: "Chickens for fattening, turkeys for fattening and laying hens show no adverse effects when the additive is added to diets at either x10 or x1000 the recommended dose."

Moreover, the panel ruled out any risk for the consumer and environment arising from the use of the product.

You can read the full EFSA opinion here.

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